Winter

Design

*This entry is a small departure from regular Alaska-based material. A detour, if you will*

There’s a fine mixture of context that can explain why someone would want to trudge out into near-freezing temperatures to try and catch a fish. Granted, if there was access to coldwater fish like trout then that’s a different story. It’s also a different story if lakes and ponds completely froze over allowing one to bore holes in the ice and attempt catching bluegill and crappie while ice-fishing. This isn’t the reality of living and fishing predominantly on the Alabama/Georgia state line.

There’s a luxury to living in this part of the country, and it does have to do with weather. We only really have two seasons a year; 8 months of summer 4 months of fall/spring. It’s nice because even in the dead of “winter” we can still catch fish. The chances aren’t great, but once you figure out how they react to winter-time weather patterns then it most definitely can be done.

Sounds like a no-brainer, right? I have a feeling what weather we consider cold might be the same type of weather that a Wisconsinite might be inclined to wear flip-flops and board shorts in. Still, our fish have winter patterns, and they aren’t too concerned what type of footwear or short you’re donning.

Taking the time to layer up in fleece and waders to nihilistically sling feathers at warm-water species like bass and bluegill doesn’t make an awful lot of sense.

There’s a reason not many people do it.

Of course, you might be stir crazy. Cabin fever is real and any excuse to get outside can outweigh the annoyance of being cold or not catching anything. Maybe part of it is just practicing and/or honing your cast. It’s possible you just want to go out and get skunked so that when spring-time comes back around you’ll REALLY appreciate a bend in your rod.

I’d like to propose a few other reasons. Maybe it’s because of the satisfaction of hooking a fish when you’re not supposed to. Maybe the gratification of duping even the most lethargic fish means that the combination of skill and knowhow was impossible for a fish to pass up. Maybe it’s because even though you won’t catch large numbers, but if you catch anything it’s likely to be of decent size.

Combine all of these together and you have plenty of good reasons if you ask me.

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